Create Awesome

web design and development for people who think the Internet shouldn't suck

Tag: users

bettershirts: Fuck Users: The Shirt for Anyone Working on the Internet […] Clients take a lot

bettershirts: Fuck Users: The Shirt for Anyone Working on the Internet […] Clients take a lot of heat for bringing misery into the online world, but it’s not their fault. They’re simply the group most directly impacted by the utter fuckery of the average user. Users can’t figure out how to login in. Once they […]

Boy, this sounds familiar. It’s like “friendly” ads are the new thing online these days. I can almost see the focus groups shaping this messaging. “So you guys don’t like ads, eh? What about resonant ads?” I hate online ads. They gobble up screen space, are irritating, distracting, and ugly, and undermine integrity. But conventional wisdom is that users won’t pay for anything on the internet, thus making advertisers a necessary evil for online success. This may have been true at some point—I’m not really sure. But 10 billion songs later, I think we can put that myth to rest. I’m more than willing to pay $25 a year for an elegant, intelligent, and above all else, ad- free photo sharing site, despite the fact that I just don’t take that many pictures. Now let’s compare some of these bold, user-driven sites to their ad-rich counterparts. Upload a video to YouTube and you’ll get a gross, gray interface with moronic commenters and ads that literally roll up over your work—if ContentID doesn’t take it down automatically. Put it on Vimeo and you get a clean interface, no ads, a functional HTML 5 beta, and easy user downloads. Comments are occasional, supportive, and thought-provoking. Put up a little money and you get even more stuff, including some great-looking stats. Say you’re looking for a job. Craigslist delivers fast, light, searchable listings. The site shreds, even over dialup, and allows you to safely and anonymously contact potential employers without even the baggage of a login.   Try Monster, CareerBuilder or another “real” job search site and you’ll be buried in corporate ad dollars, with excessively rich content, nonsense data, and go-nowhere “apply online” links.   While Craigslist is supported by fees on job listings in some cities, it doesn’t invite the bottomless, pay-for-placement spending, and has no intention of seeking it. If job-seekers weren’t so desperate, I like to imagine (in a fantasy world where users aren’t too stupid to figure out how to enter their own URLs) that Craigslist would have put the others out of business by now. It’s not that I’m entirely rejecting the idea that advertisements and user interest can co-exist—beer commercials, for example, have been a welcome distraction from various sporting events for years.  But online ads have yet to be implemented in such a symbiotic fashion. For me, and I think most other people, the web is a personally-driven experience. There are no time-outs or inning changes to wait through, and I think this difference really renders traditional advertising—even interactive, emotional, resonant traditional advertising—far less effective.  That said, I’m curious to see what Twitter and Apple can come up with.

There is one big difference between a Promoted Tweet and a regular Tweet. Promoted Tweets must meet a higher bar—they must resonate with users.

Read Write Web I really have to disagree with this. The web isn’t a welfare state. Users pay no web taxes, surrender no rights to developers, and have no expectation of representation, protection, or support. Developers pay attention to user feedback at their discretion, because on paper, users collectively decide which ventures become successful and which ventures fail. This is the social contract that governs the online world. Demagoguery abets us little. How many productive hours were lost to users idiotically opening malicious email attachments and blithely forwarding them to co-workers? We need more better-educated, more intelligent users, and dumbed-down designs present no incentive for users to wise up. Users are and have always been on their own for learning how things work. We haven’t failed people who can’t grasp the address bar—they have failed themselves. We only fail them when we begin catering to their shortcomings.

While we mock those users, the simple fact is they haven’t necessarily failed, something failed them.

Yeah, I want to kick it with users who are driving traffic to Fox News, People and Drudge. I hope th

Yeah, I want to kick it with users who are driving traffic to Fox News, People and Drudge. I hope they ask me to join them on Farmville, too. (source, via)

Read Write Web
No, you’re wrong, and nothing could be further from the truth. The web is not a welfare state. Users pay no web taxes, surrender no rights to developers, and have no expectation of representation, protection, or support. Developers pay attention to user feedback at their discretion, because on paper, users collectively decide which ventures become successful and which ventures fail. This is the social contract that governs the online world. Demagoguery abets us little. How many productive hours were lost to users idiotically opening malicious email attachments and blithely forwarding them to co-workers? We need more better-educated, more intelligent users, and dumbed-down designs present no incentive for users to wise up. Users are and have always been on their own for learning how things work. We haven’t failed people who can’t grasp the address bar—they have failed themselves. We only fail them when we begin catering to their shortcomings.

While we mock those users, the simple fact is they haven’t necessarily failed, something failed them.

Tumblr desperately needs a “poweruser” setting

The slideshow in the previous post is a good example of why. I have no way to control the size of that slideshow. Or to make it full screen. Or to link to specific slides.  And I’m pretty sure Mono Slideshow has those settings. It’s not that I consider myself too good for Tumblr; it’s […]

Things people try to log into

mrgan: Regarding this morning’s amazing occurrence where people who had googled for “facebook login” and got taken to a news story about Facebook then assumed that the news website was Facebook itself… Flickr user jimwhimpey posted screenshot of login pages for Facebook and Flickr; this resulted in comments from users trying to log in to […]

It’s not so much that Tumblr keeps cranking out these useless featurettes—it’s that 600+

It’s not so much that Tumblr keeps cranking out these useless featurettes—it’s that 600+ people decide to “like” them.

somuchsass: TWITTER: CUT IT OUT WITH THE NEW-FANGLED TECHNOLOGIES This is borderline Facebook-ish. N

somuchsass: TWITTER: CUT IT OUT WITH THE NEW-FANGLED TECHNOLOGIES This is borderline Facebook-ish. Not a compliment. Cosmo’s 17th most frequent source of amusement: users who complain about new features ruining online products—for about 15 minutes.